Socrates

Jerome C. Glenn on Singularity 1 on 1: Science is an epistemology in the house of philosophy

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Jerome C. Glenn is co-founder and Director of The Millennium Project and I had great fun talking to him during our first interview. But it has been over two years since our previous conversation and so, when Jason Ganz reminded me that the latest State of the Future report has been out for several months now, I jumped at the opportunity to have Jerome back on Singularity 1 on 1. In this second discussion with Glenn we cover a wide variety of topics such as: The State […]

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Singularity 1 on 1: Jonathan Mugan on The Curiosity Cycle

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Jonathan Mugan is not only a computer scientist specializing in machine learning and AI but also a father of three and the author of The Curiosity Cycle: Preparing Your Child for the Ongoing Technological Explosion. Since this is one of the few good books on the topic that I am aware of, I thought I’d bring Jonathan on Singularity 1 on 1 so that we can dive deeper into the issues surrounding child education in an age of accelerating change. During our 30 min conversation with […]

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The Trail’s End: David Rosenbaum’s Sci-Fi Short is Bonnie and Clyde with Androids

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What if Bonnie and Clyde was re-envisioned as a sci-fi? That’s the idea behind David Rosenbaum’s short sci film The Trail’s End. The short is the prequel to Bonnie and Clyde, with androids going on the run from the law. It premiered at the LA Shorts Fest, has fantastic VFX and sleek cinematography, not to mention an interesting premise playing on a classic story we all know. Synopsis: On the final day of his life, an android has an unexpected encounter that alters the course of […]

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Desperate search for relief in a time of anxiety [a 16-year-old writes to Socrates]

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This is the email message that a 16-year-old girl sent me. It is one of a series of similar messages that I have been receiving and replying to for some time now. But on this occasion I decided to share publicly both the letter and my reply in the hope of providing others with easy access to my suggestions as well as soliciting further wisdom and mentorship from the general Singularity Weblog community. Desperate search for relief in a time of anxiety Hello! I am a 16 year […]

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Arthur Traviss Corry on Singularity 1 on 1: Give Bitcoin a Try!

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I have often felt that being located in Toronto, Canada puts me at a bit of a disadvantage with respect to having a futuristic high-tech blog and podcast. Living in Silicon Valley or New York [or a number of cities in Asia and Europe] appears to make it easier to stay at the cutting edge of technology and meet the amazing people pushing it forward. However, after visiting Decentral, I am convinced that there you can meet people who are making things happen and changing the world as […]

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The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

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The Creative Commons-licensed version of The Internet’s Own Boy, Brian Knappenberger’s documentary about Aaron Swartz, is now available on the Internet Archive, which is especially useful for people outside of the US, who aren’t able to pay to see it online. It’s a remarkable movie and I hope you make some time to watch it. The Internet Archive makes the movie available to download or stream, in MPEG 4 and Ogg. There’s also a torrentable version. The Internet’s Own Boy follows the story of programming prodigy and […]

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Three Problems Computers Can Never Solve

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A new video by New Scientist presents three problems that computers can allegedly never solve. In short, the argument is that despite their complexity, almost all modern computers are of the type conceived by Alan Turing in 1936 – and they all have the same limitations. Turing showed that any computer predicated on human logic alone will struggle with the same questions that we do. They will always find some questions undecidable: not so much “computer says ‘no’” as “computer says ‘can never know’”. Check out […]

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